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Have you ever listened to a song and thought, “this reminds me of something else”? That’s exactly what happened when The Killers first heard Electric Light Orchestra’s music. The Las Vegas band has been open about their admiration for ELO’s sound, and it’s not hard to hear the influence in some of their biggest hits. In this article, we’ll explore the connections between the two bands and how ELO’s legacy continues to impact modern music. From “Mr. Brightside” to “When You Were Young”, we’ll take a closer look at the tracks that showcase The Killers’ ELO-inspired sound. So sit back, grab your headphones, and get ready to discover a new layer to The Killers’ discography.,

The Killers’ admiration for ELO’s sound

One of the best examples of The Killers’ admiration for ELO’s sound can be found in their breakout hit, “Mr. Brightside”. The track’s opening guitar riff bears a striking resemblance to ELO’s “Don’t Bring Me Down”, with both songs featuring a driving, anthemic melody that sets the tone for the entire piece. But it’s not just the instrumentation that draws comparisons between the two bands – the lyrics of “Mr. Brightside” also evoke the same sense of yearning and heartache that ELO captured in many of their own songs. It’s clear that The Killers were able to capture the essence of ELO’s sound and translate it into something that was entirely their own, and “Mr. Brightside” remains a true classic of modern rock.,

Mr. Brightside and its ELO connection

One of the best examples of how The Killers were influenced by ELO’s sound can be found in their breakout hit “Mr. Brightside”. The opening guitar riff in the song bears a striking resemblance to ELO’s “Don’t Bring Me Down”, which showcases a driving, anthemic melody that lays the foundation for the entire composition. It’s not just the instrumentation that makes the connection clear. The lyrics of “Mr. Brightside” evoke the same sense of yearning and heartache that ELO captured in many of their own pieces. The Killers were able to capture the essence of ELO’s sound and translate it into something unique that is a true classic of modern rock. This track sets the stage for “When You Were Young”, where we can see how ELO influenced The Killers once again.

“When You Were Young” and its ELO influence

The title track from The Killers’ second album, “When You Were Young”, is another prime example of the band’s admiration for ELO’s music. The song’s opening guitar riff is reminiscent of ELO’s “Showdown”, and the use of strings and synthesizers throughout the track’s soaring chorus is a clear nod to the orchestral pop sound that Jeff Lynne and his band were famous for.

But it’s not just the instrumentation that connects “When You Were Young” to ELO’s music. The lyrics also borrow from the themes of love and loss that were central to many of ELO’s hits. In particular, the chorus of “When You Were Young” taps into the same wistful nostalgia that Lynne captured so well on songs like “Can’t Get It Out of My Head”.

Overall, “When You Were Young” showcases The Killers’ ability to channel the spirit of ELO’s sound into their own music. It’s a tribute to the enduring influence that Lynne and his band have had on rock music over the years. And as we’ll see in the next section, “When You Were Young” is far from the only example of The Killers’ fondness for ELO’s music.,

Other notable ELO-inspired tracks by The Killers

In addition to “When You Were Young,” The Killers have been inspired by several other ELO tracks throughout their discography. One notable example is “All These Things That I’ve Done,” which features a soaring chorus reminiscent of ELO’s signature harmonies. Another track, “A Dustland Fairytale,” combines ELO’s orchestral sound with lyrics that pay homage to Bruce Springsteen’s storytelling style.

It’s clear that The Killers have a deep respect for ELO’s music and have found ways to infuse their own sound with elements of Lynne’s iconic style. But the influence of ELO extends far beyond just one band. As we’ll explore in the next section, Lynne’s contribution to rock music has had a lasting impact that continues to resonate with artists around the world.,

ELO’s legacy and impact on modern music

Lynne’s contribution to rock music through ELO has left a lasting impact that has inspired countless artists over the years. From their innovative use of orchestration to their mastery of blending rock and pop, ELO’s sound has influenced the work of artists ranging from Queen to Daft Punk.

ELO’s legacy can be felt in the music of modern bands like Foxygen, who have cited ELO as a major influence. And Lynne’s work as a producer and collaborator has also had an enduring impact on the music industry. Lynne has produced albums for George Harrison, Tom Petty, and even worked on the Beatles’ Anthology project. His signature sound can be heard in many of these iconic artists’ most beloved tracks.

Overall, ELO’s influence can be seen in the way that rock music has evolved over the years. Their use of elements like strings, synthesizers, and layered harmonies paved the way for future generations of artists to experiment with new sounds and styles. And while Lynne and ELO may have started out as a relatively niche act, their music has proven to be timeless, continuing to inspire and influence artists to this day. The Killers are just one example of the many artists who have been touched by ELO’s music, and their story serves as a testament to Lynne’s enduring legacy in the world of rock music.,

In conclusion, Electric Light Orchestra’s influence on The Killers is undeniable. From the catchy guitar riffs in “Mr. Brightside” to the nostalgic sound of “When You Were Young,” ELO’s impact can be felt throughout The Killers’ music. But ELO’s legacy goes beyond just one band. Their innovative sound and experimentation with orchestration continue to inspire musicians across genres. So take some time to explore ELO’s discography and hear the connections for yourself. As Jeff Lynne, ELO’s frontman, once said, “Music is everybody’s possession. It’s only publishers who think that people own it.” Let’s keep discovering and creating with the music that moves us.